Church Services on Radio, TV and on-line

Radio and TV Worship Services

Sunday

BBC Radio Scotland at 7:30 – New Every Sunday: a service of worship

BBC Radio 4 at 8:10 – Sunday Worship

BBC One at 13:15 – Songs of Praise

BBC Radio 3 at 15:00 – Evensong (a repeat of the Wednesday afternoon broadcast)

Monday – Saturday

BBC Radio 4 at 5:43 – Prayer for the Day

Monday – Friday

BBC Radio 4 (LW only) at 9:45 – Daily Service

Wednesday

BBC Radio 3 at 15:00 – Evensong

On-line Worship

An SEC Eucharist Service will be broadcast at 11.00am on each Sunday at: https://www.scotland.anglican.org/broadcast-sunday-worship/
The service will subsequently be available to download at the above address in video and audio formats.

Our own participative ‘Active Worship‘ service is available for you to join in with.

There are services daily from Inverness Cathedral, available via the Cathedral’s:

for both ‘live’ watching and for later playback.

Season of Creation – Self Directed Reflection at St Finnbarr’s

May be an image of text that says 'SEASON OF CREATION LOVING THE EARTH GOD LOVES'

Hi folks,

As September begins we enter the ‘Season of Creation’ and churches across the globe turn their attention to how the behaviour and actions of humankind are affecting the created world.

Many of us take ‘green issues’ very seriously, but others give little or no thought to what is happening to the planet on which we live – even pouring scorn on those who express their concerns about the very real and present threat to our existence as a species.

At St Finnbarr’s Church (Dornoch) we have put together a reflective walk – with a particular focus on water and the oceans – around the inside of our church building – looking at images and original artworks. Everyone is welcome to come along and take part in this self directed activity and church will be open from 11am – 12noon each Wednesday beginning on 8th Sept and finishing on 29th.

We hope you enjoy this reflection, but we also hope that you are challenged to consider the part you are playing in the climate crisis.

Fr Simon

Introduction to the Season of Creation

The Season

The Season of Creation is a time to renew our relationship with our Creator and all creation through celebration, conversation, and commitment together. During the Season of Creation, we join our sisters and brothers in the ecumenical family in prayer and action for our common home.

Ecumenical Patriarch of the Orthodox Churches, Dimitrios I declared 1st September as a day of prayer for creation for the Orthodox in 1989. The Orthodox church year starts on that day with a commemoration of how God created the world. On 4th October, Roman Catholics and other churches from the Western traditions commemorate Francis of Assisi, known to many as the author of the Canticle of the Creatures. The beginning and the end date of Season of Creation are therefore linked with the concern for creation in the Eastern and the Western traditions respectively.

Since then Christians worldwide have progressively embraced the season as part of their annual calendar. Pope Francis made the Roman Catholic Church’s adoption of the season official in 2015 and in 2020 he said:

This is the season for letting our prayer be inspired anew by closeness to nature…to reflect on our lifestyles…for undertaking prophetic actions…directing the planet towards life, not death.”

Pope Francis

This Season is now observed in most of the mainline denominations worldwide, including several Provinces of the Anglican Communion, and forms a focus for Christian reflection on the environment. Over the years, it has evolved to include justice for the poor as well as justice for the environment and in fact there is a close relationship between these ‘two cries of St Francis.’

In the Episcopal Church

In the SEC, the Faith and Order Board and College of Bishops have now approved the introduction of a Season of Creation to our liturgical calendar, running from the first Sunday of September for four weeks, concluding with Thanksgiving for Harvest on the fifth Sunday.

This reflects the commitment of the Scottish Episcopal Church to responding to the global environmental and climate crisis, which has drawn attention to what has perhaps become a neglected aspect of our faith: that God created the world, that it is good, and that we, as human beings created in God’s image, have a particular responsibility for the care of God’s creation. It is right that this be reflected in our worship.

Introduction on Zoom

The Liturgy Committee will be offering an introduction to the recently published experimental liturgies for the Season of Creation (https://www.scotland.anglican.org/who-we-are/publications/liturgies/season-of-creation-worship-material-for-experimental-use/) and to the on-line forms for feedback.

This introduction will be offered on the morning of Friday, 13 August at 10am, and the evening of Wednesday, 18 August at 7:30pm.

It is necessary to register in advance for these events. If you would like to join either of these Zoom sessions, please email Sandra Brindley at office@anglican.org to register, and you will be supplied with the necessary log-in information.

Northern Pilgrims’ Way launched

Service of Dedication in St Duthac’s Collegiate Church in Tain

Today the Northern Pilgrims’ Way was launched with a dedication service in St Duthac’s Collegiate Church in Tain. Bishop Mark led the service, Jamie Campbell was at the organ and Rev Lizzie Campbell sang the hymns and an anthem and Rev James Currall read the lessons. The Lord’s Lieutenants of Ross-shire (Joanie Whiteford) and Sutherland (Monica Main) were in attendance along with a number of representatives of the Churches.

During the service, an information board was dedicated and the members of the congregations were given blessed cockle shells and candles as symbols of the pilgrimage, but in his address Bishop Mark gave strict instructions that the shells were to be given to pilgrims on the way, that those present encountered in the coming months. He also warned that launching the Way was only the beginning of something and not the end.

You can watch the service on Youtube below:

The original pilgrims were not just trying to get from A to B. The trials and tribulations of the journey were part of the experience, as was calling at recognised holy sites along the way. Modern pilgrims want to feel that they are following in the footsteps of these previous generations. So re-creating a pilgrimage route is not as simple as looking at a map and working out the shortest way from one place to another.

The Northern Pilgrims’ Way is what is known in the trade as a braided route. In other words, it offers the pilgrim alternative tracks between the start and end points. While some routes have more history attached to them than others, all are genuine pilgrimage ways through the North of Scotland.

Map of the Northern Pilgrim’s Way

In our time, pilgrimage is being revived in many denominations. Indeed, it is a feature of most main religions and seems to answer a deep-seated need within us to re-connect with the creator of our world and to work out our own place in this creation.

Further events are planned in the coming months at Thurso and at Kirkwall where the route ends.

  • 3rd July 2021 in Old St Peter’s Kirk, Thurso at 12:30pm
  • 20th August 2021 in East Church, Kirkwall at 12:00noon
Church and State ready for Pilgrimage

Gender and Liturgy in Conversation – 12th-17th April 2021

Responding to the Sacred:

Gender & Liturgy in Conversation

A free online conference with a new panel discussion released each day on Facebook and Youtube, 12-16 April, culminating in a plenary session and act of worship on Saturday 17 April.

Taking in a wide range of perspectives our speakers will discuss issues in the field of gender and liturgy, in the context of liturgical reform beginning within the Scottish Episcopal Church.

For more information visit the facebook page Gender and Liturgy Conference or download the Final Programme and in case of queries email genandlit@gmail.com

The speakers include:

  • Merete Thommassen (University of Oslo),
  • Bill Paterson (MindfulnessFife),
  • Bishop Ian Paton (SEC),
  • Leon van Ommen (SEC, University of Aberdeen),
  • Bridget Nichols (Church of Ireland Theological Institute, Dublin),
  • David Jasper (SEC, University of Glasgow),
  • Lisa Isherwood (University of Winchester),
  • Beverly Clack (Oxford Brookes University).

Programme for the week

(all talks will be premiered via the facebook pageGender and Liturgy Conference)

MONDAY 12TH APRIL 7PM – Contextualising with Bridget Nichols and Merete Thomassen

Bridget Nichols will give an overview of gender and liturgy in the Anglican Communion to provide a context for discussion. Merete Thomassen will respond drawing on her experience of liturgical revision in the Lutheran Church in Norway.

TUESDAY 13TH APRIL 7PM – Made in God’s Image with Beverley Clack and Harriet Harris

Beverley will talk about questions raised in relation to the (gendered) nature of God and humankind, and Harriet will respond.

WEDNESDAY 14TH APRIL 7PM – Responding to the Masculine with Bill Paterson and Léon Van Ommen

Bill Paterson will talk about the changing nature of masculinity and his work with men’s groups. Léon Van Ommen will respond in terms of how this might be integrated into the discussion of liturgical change.

THURSDAY 15TH APRIL 7PM – Embodiment with Lisa Isherwood and Marion Chatterley

Lisa Isherwood will talk about body and feminist theology from her experience of teaching and academic leadership over many years, and Marion will respond.

FRIDAY 16TH APRIL – Gathering Feedback

Send the team your thoughts and questions, and email us for the link to the Zoom plenary: genandlit@gmail.com 

SATURDAY 17TH APRIL from 10AM – Zoom Conference Plenary, chaired by Trevor Hart

Our speaker and conference attendees will have a chance to discuss issues and themes brought up over the week, with opportunity for live q and a from our audience.

SATURDAY 17TH APRIL 2PM – Concluding Act of Worship: Modelling Ideas

Building on a Strong Foundation – WDP 2021

WORLD DAY OF PRAYER

Friday, 5th March 2021

Build on a strong foundation’

Written by Christian women of Vanuatu

All Welcome!

This year it will not be possible for the Churches to get together as usual, except via Zoom and there will be a variety of such services taking place.

National Service

This will be hosted by the Scottish Committee of the WDP and will be held at 2pm on 5th March (Zoom open from 1:45pm).

Easter Ross Service

Hosted by the Easter Ross Inter-Church Group and will also be held at 2pm on 5th March.

Sutherland Service

Hosted by Lairg CoS and will be held at 6:45pm on 5th March

Zoom Details

All are welcome at any of these Services and I have circulated Zoom joining details for the Sutherland and Easter Ross Services to the members of the relevant congregations by email. If anyone wants Zoom details for the National Service or wishes to join one of the other, but han’t got the appropriate details, email me and I will pass them on. For security reasons these details will no be shared on web sites or on social media.

A file containing the Order of Service is available here

Pancake Party – Shrove Tuesday – 16th February

Food, Fellowship, and Fun

at our

PANCAKE PARTY

on

Shrove Tuesday, 16 February at 7:30pm

this year

via Zoom

This year you will have to make your own pancakes, but the usual quiz and other entertainment will be available and people in all our congregations will be able to join in the fun.

If you have a ‘Party Piece‘ that you would like to contribute, then let James, Janet or Beatrice know and then everyone will be able to appreciate your special talent!!

Lent Study Groups 2021

In our Lent Study this year we will look at Lament and the Psalms.

A quick search in dictionaries for a definition of lament reveals that it’s: to express sorrow, regret or unhappiness about something, or it’s a formal expression of sorrow or mourning. But Biblical Lament is actually much more than this. It’s not just a formal expression of sorrow.
When we experience loss, grief is inevitable. In St. Augustine’s terms, we’re each a collection of loves that bind us to people, places, and practices. Whenever these bonds of love are severed, we grieve. Grief isn’t a choice; we’re subject to it whether we like it or not.

Lament, by contrast, is the exercise of spiritual agency in the face of loss. As a spiritual practice lament seeks to incorporate the experience of loss into the broader story of our lives before God. Where grief threatens to shatter the coherence of our story, lament re-opens our hearts to the possibility of a recovered sense of wholeness. Lament doesn’t internalise our pain, sorrow or loss, but helps us to call out to God. So it’s not just an expression of deep emotion resulting from loss, it calls to God for action and ends in praise to God. To lament is to join a long line of those who have wrestled with God in the midst of their sorrow.

We find lament throughout the Old Testament. Most clearly we find lament in the Psalms and these are referred to extensively throughout the New Testament. The Psalms are the Prayer Book of the Bible. As such they encompass the full range of human experiences—and in particular make room for experiences of suffering through Psalms of Lament.

The sessions will be centred around the following headings:

  1. The Need for Lament
  2. The Power of Lament
  3. Lament and the Suffering of Others
  4. Collective Grief
  5. Lament as an Act of Love

There will be a group meeting on Zoom
Wednesday Evenings from 7:30-9:00pm
(24th February and 3rd, 10th, 17th and 24th March)

Zoom details have been circulated by email

The material will also be available on paper, by email and on the Web Site at:

https://episcopaldornochtain.org/study-group-resources/

For more details or to receive paper or emailed copies of the materials speak to James (contact details).

Lent Study 2021

The Lent Study this year will be about Lament and the Psalms.

When we feel blessed in life, when we experience goodness and wholeness, we turn to God in praise and thanksgiving. But what happens when we experience just the opposite? What happens when we are overcome by the presence of chaos, brokenness, suffering and death, or by a sudden sense of our human vulnerability? When we hurt physically, we cry out in pain; when we hurt spiritually, we cry out in lament.

The five sessions will be flexible and explore this often neglected practice, with particular reference to Covid-19 and Climate Change, though we will have the opportunity to explore lament in relation to the grief that we feel in relation to any loss.

As with last year’s Lent Study and our Advent Study, there will be a set of study materials each week, which you may use in whatever way you like. There will also be a set on five Wednesday evening Zoom sessions (on 24th February, 3rd , 10th , 17th and 24th March) starting at 7:30pm. The Zoom joining details will be circulated by email closer to the time.

Any questions or queries about the Lent Study should be directed to James.